Patient Safety

Identify Canadian Pharmacy Filling the PrescriptionThe U.S. patient should know the Canadian pharmacy’s name, address, phone number, license number, and province where the pharmacy is licensed. To be certain, go to VERIFY A CIPA MEMBER and enter the name of the pharmacy you are considering.

This information should be clearly identified on the web page, on registration forms or provided by affiliate U.S. organizations.

Always deal with a CIPA pharmacy, but be aware that some fraudulent use the CIPA seal does exist so be sure to verify the website name.

 
Contact the Canadian provincial pharmacy regulatory agencyTo ensure that the pharmacy is a legitimate Canadian pharmacy the patient can contact the provincial pharmacy regulatory agency in British Columbia or Manitoba

The provincial pharmacy regulatory agency sets standards of practice and regulates pharmacy from a patient safety perspective.

If contacting a regulatory agency, be sure to mention the official name of the filling pharmacy that will be found on the CIPA member’s site.

A U.S. patient has the same rights as a Canadian patient to file a complaint with a provincial pharmacy regulatory agency.

 
Make Sure Your Canadian Pharmacy Follows the RulesThe Canadian pharmacy should require a prescription from the patient’s U.S. physician.

The Canadian pharmacy should obtain both demographic and medical information from the U.S. patient.

The Canadian pharmacy should have a Canadian physician review patient information before authorizing a Canadian prescription.

The U.S. patient should have access to a Canadian pharmacist for the purpose of medication counseling and drug information.

 
Beware of Rogue operators and fraudulent use of the CIPA SealBad operators on the internet outnumber the legitimate and safe CIPA members. The rogues and frauds want you to believe they are real pharmacies. You’ll always be safe if you avoid them so we maintain a comprehensive list to assist you.

Rogues are websites that engage in a variety of unsafe practices: they sell medications without prescription, won’t tell you who they are or where they are located, or sell substandard – even counterfeit products.

Fraudulent sites are those that masquerade as something they are not: they aren’t Canadian, they aren’t pharmacies, and they certainly aren’t CIPA certified – yet they hijack our seal to deceive you.

Consumer Tip: Never order prescription drugs from a website that doesn’t require a doctor’s prescription. CIPA member pharmacies put your safety first.